Heuchera ‘Silver Scrolls’

Heuchera ‘Silver Scrolls’Silver scrolls Heuchera
Common Name:  Coral bells
Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Saxifragaceae
Height:  plant 8-12 inches, flower stalks 24-in
Spread: 8 to 12-inch
Bloom Time: June to July
Flower: Pinkish White, Showy
Sun: Filtered sun to part shade
Soil: Rich humus, Well-draining
Water Needs:  Average to Moist
Foliage Colorful!  Emerge silver flushed with burgundy, matures into silver with dark purple veins.
Uses: Edging, Woodland gardens, Containers, Foliage Garden Interest, Perennial beds, Mass plantings for ground cover
Attributes: Deer Tolerant, evergreen in warm climates.
USDA Zone: 4 to 9

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Plants Chat!

“….experiment showed not only that plants can learnby association — which is pexels-photo-255441.jpegastounding in itself — but also how easily humans underestimate plants. “We are plant blind,”…. Monica Gagliano Ecologist University of Western Australia

There was a very interesting article written by Marta Zaraska in the May 2017 issue of Discover Magazine about the ongoing research on plant behaviors. Gagliano, and other researchers, are discovering how plants talk to each other,  and not only do plants learn by association, but they remember and make decisions. They recognize family members, learn language from their parents, support other plants and warn each other. Some plants even count. They are “brainier than you think”!

Read the full article here….

http://discovermagazine.com/2017/may-2017/smarty-plants

Garden of the Month: August 2017

The garden that Jacob Gougé has created around the home he shares with his wife and LR 5-17daughter at 240 N. First St. reflects both his creativity and his respect for living things.  It is the Ashland Garden Club’s Garden of the Month for August.  Over the 17 years they have lived there, Gougé has salvaged and bartered the materials to create terracing in the back, define garden beds, build a fire pit, display interesting artifacts, and more on this small lot.   It was bare dirt when they moved in.  He is very resourceful.

But Jacob has a generous spirit as well that prompts him to offer lilacs to passersby, share cuttings of his many succulents with those who ask, and invite admiring strangers inside the gate to see the whole garden.

IMG_2993Along with two smaller lilacs elsewhere in front, there is a huge lilac bush in the northwest corner of the fenced area.  Many of the branches of this lilac are five or more inches in diameter and have an unusual shredded bark.  This lilac bush is strong enough to support one end of two hammocks!

There are extraordinary ceramic pieces throughout the property, most of them created by Gougé.  He also pursues all manner of artistic expression via painting, sewing, beading,and other media. In addition, Jacob makes interesting planters for succulents out of stones or gnarled wood in which he drills holes to plant materials and for drainage.

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Food crops are concentrated in the back yard, that Jacob calls his “in town farm.”  This garden is 100% organic.  He grows lettuce all year, protecting the yield from the blazing sun at this time of year with a colorful umbrella.  He also grows asparagus, squash, carrots, snap peas, herbs of many varieties, and much more, often in recycled containers. He starts most plants from seeds in a hot box.  The family has three healthy chickens that provide eggs as well as droppings for compost.IMG_3001FullSizeRender 3

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Home Remedy

Aphid Control

Pour 2 tablespoons liquid dish soap into 1 gallon water. Stir the dish soap into the water and transfer the contents into a plastic spray bottle.

Spray the affected plant’s leaves on both sides with the soapy mixture. Pay attention to coat the underside of the leaves with the mixture, as this is where you’ll find the highest concentration of aphids.

Spray the soapy mixture directly onto any aphids you notice falling from the leaves. The aphids are small, and it’s necessary to shoot them with the soapy water to kill the unwanted pests.

Rinse away the soapy residue after one to two hours. Allowing the soap to remain on the leaves for longer than a few hours can cause damage and burning. Use a garden hose or spray bottle filled with plain water to remove the residue.

Reapply the mixture every few days, or as necessary, to keep the aphid infestation under control.

Tip:  Add 1 teaspoon vegetable oil to the mixture to increase the mixture’s density and make it stickier, helping it attach to and kill the aphids more effectively.

Warning: Test the soapy mixture on a small leaf before a larger application. If the plant shows sign of wilting or damage, don’t use this mixture.

Reprinted from SFgate online:   http://www.sfgate.com/homeandgarden