Gleaning

Gleaning is good, because so much usable produce goes to waste! Check out how to get involved with Neighborhood Harvest in Ashland.

close up of fruits hanging on tree

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

About  Neighborhood Harvest:

“Neighborhood Harvest is an organization dedicated to harvesting fruits, nuts, and other produce that would otherwise go to waste from yards, gardens, and farms in and around Ashland, Oregon and sharing the abundance with the community.

We will only harvest fruit that has not been sprayed with pesticides. At least 25% of what we harvest is donated to local hunger relief organizations, 25% goes to our harvester volunteers, 25% we offer to the home owner, and the remaining 25% we sell or trade to support the organization. ”

To date, we have harvested over 10,000 pounds of fruit, most from within 15 miles of Ashland.

To learn more about the organization, or inform us of possible harvest sites, please call or e-mail.
541 708-1807 – info@neighborhoodharvest.org

Garden of the Month: August 2018

622 Drager Street:

Earlier this year, Alison Lerch, the Fire Adapted Communities Coordinator with the Ashland Fire Department, gave a presentation to the Ashland Garden Club about firewise landscaping. She mentioned a garden that was not only firewise but waterwise, calling it the perfect Ashland Garden. Since then we have discovered that the garden at 622 Drager Street, is also pollinator-friendly and deer resistant. The perfect Ashland garden indeed!01_622 Drager

Nancy Garriott is responsible for this wonderful garden. She and her husband Ted had the craftsman house built on the corner lot five years ago and took on the landscaping project themselves, relying on knowledge accumulated over the years.02 summer garden

Nancy has been creating gardens all of her adult life. Each of the eight gardens in her past taught her something about the secrets to gardening success. Early on she immersed herself in gardening publications and classes. Later, she found each plant was teaching her what it liked and what it needed. She says, “It turns out that getting your hands dirty does have a ‘grounding’ affect and is a great way to learn how to care for your plants.”03 summer garden

Nancy and Ted started with the hardscape of small rock retaining walls and garden borders, flagstone and gravel paths, and drip lines. They found a stone mulch that looks like wood but is obviously not fire-prone. Nancy propagated many of the perennials, including favorites that are drought tolerant, deer resistant, and non-invasive with colorful, long-lasting blooms. Among them are echinacea, gaillardia, helenium, coreopsis, rudbeckia, crocosmia Emily McKenzie, sedum autumn joy, and yarrow. She discovered that a bonus is that these plants are great pollinator plants too. She also propagated several varieties of sedum which she likes because they are evergreen, drought tolerant, come in many colors which adds interest to the winter garden, and spread easily without being invasive. Then Nancy developed a list of shrubbery that would enhance the small space but would add an evergreen element to the winter garden when the perennials die back. She focused on dwarf varieties of native, drought tolerant, deer resistant plants, looking for a variety of textures and colors which she thinks helps the plants contrast with each other and stand out visually. The plants she settled on were low growing manzanita, arbutus, nandina, evergreen candytuft, myrtle, hebe, and choisya (Mexican orange). She also found that some evergreen herbs such as sage and basil make good aromatic border plants.

04 summer garden

In designing the new garden, she applied the knowledge that she needed to leave enough room around each plant to accommodate its growth, put taller plants in the back, and create a color and texture balance. She also leaves room for her favorite annuals which are gazanias and many varieties of zinnias. These also happen to be drought tolerant and deer resistant and add joyful color to the garden.05 summer garden

Nancy says that “The favorite thing about my garden is that we live in an accessible part of Ashland where I can share my garden with the many people that walk by.”

Submitted by: Ruth Sloan

Photos by Nancy and Ted Garriott.

Feast of Will 2018

Yearly, Ashland Garden Club members donated flowers from their personal gardens to create numerous table arrangements for the Ashland Lions Club annual Feast of Will dinner in Lithia Park.    Members of Ashland Garden Club include (many) master gardeners, a state flower judge, retire florists, professional landscapers, and people who just love flowers and plants!

SOU Botanical Tour

Southern Oregon University Botanical Tour features 107 trees, pollinator gardens, and the SOU Farm.  Some trees on the tour are older than the school itself.

In 2014, the Arbor Day Foundation accredited SOU with its  Tree Campus  award, and in 2015 the University became the first Bee Campus in the nation by providing pollinator beds and bee habitats throughout the campus.  SOU has pledged with the Friends of the Earth Bee Cause Campaign to stop the use of all neonicotinoids on campus in an effort to help protect pollinators . Neonicotinoids are harmful systemic insecticides.

SOU offers guided tours and self-guided tours. Brochures can be picked up at the SOU Landscape Services located at 351 Walker Avenue.  Tel: 541-552-6117

Landscape Services Mike Oxendine
Mike Oxendine is SOU’s Landscape Services Supervisor

https://landscape.sou.edu/sou-botanical-tour/

 

Ashland Garden Club members on a guided tour with Mike.

Garden of the Month: May 2018

186 Ohio Street –  It’s such a pleasant surprise to discover the beautiful garden at 186 Ohio Street.  Although the house is on a flag lot, much of the garden is visible from the street or sidewalk.  Stacy and Eric Poole own the property and have lived here with their two daughters Allie and Aimee, a dog, cat, and three chickens since 2001.  It’s easy to find the property because of two large basalt pillars installed near the sidewalk by their friend, the stone sculptor Jesse Biesanz.IMG_1

In fact, the Pooles have many talented friends who have added to the charming ambience of the property.  Metal sculptor Cheryl Garcia is a friend who helped Stacy with the original garden design and installation.  There are numerous Garcia sculptural pieces throughout.  Landscape designer and friend Jane Hardgrove has helped transform areas of the garden with her vision.IMG_2

Stacy averages two to five hours per week working in the garden but wishes she could spend more time.  Vidal Cervantes has been helping with weeding and cleanup.  Allie and Aimee enjoy spending time in the garden and help their mother realize changes.IMG_3

The garden has evolved as the children are growing up.  The current trampoline replaced a swing set, and is likely to be replaced before long with a fire pit and seating area.  Other areas of the landscape have been reworked in phases.IMG_4

Among Stacy’s favorite plants are the sunflowers of summer and Japanese maples.  There are raised beds for vegetables, including lettuces, tomatoes, and basil, and various kinds of berries abound.  Tiny (less than two inches high) cyclamen catch the eye in March.  Pleasant surprises are everywhere at all times of year.IMG_5

Article by Ruth Sloan
Photos by Larry Rosengren