Garden of the Month: July 2018

995 Park Street-

The selection committee for the Ashland Garden Club’s Garden of the Month program has had its eye on D’Anne and Steve Shaw’s charming garden at 955 Park Street for a very long time.  The first time we approached them, they said that the back yard was not ready for prime time.  The next year, the giant incense cedar in the front yard was felled.  The year after that, they were remodeling the house.  Every year something happened because these homeowners are never idle.  Finally, the time has come:  This is the July 2018 Garden of the Month.
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The wedge-shaped garden is gorgeous, both front and back.  D’Anne and Steve both love color and work hard, each averaging ten hours per week despite their busy careers.  They share responsibility for design and maintenance.  They consider it a work in progress, continually making changes.  The garden is entirely organic and is a designated pollinator garden.  Don’t miss the Pollinator Garden tour on July 15 (https://www.ashland.or.us/Page.asp?NavID=17460).  The Shaws were part of the tour last year but have made way for new gardens this year.IMG_3600

Steve reports that he was introduced to gardening as a child by his father who taught him the value of hard work from an early age and gave him a deep appreciation for gardens.  Three pretty Gingko trees were given to D’Anne in one-gallon pots a long time ago and she cared for them in the pots for years until settling on this property. IMG_3609

You will see how much they have grown and thrived in the 18 years since being planted in the ground.  The unusual round metal arbor in the corner of the front yard was made for them for their wedding.IMG_3605

Among the many beautiful flowering plants are roses, hydrangea, peonies, lilies, foxglove, columbine, ground orchids and dahlias.  Walk or drive by to see how prettily these things and many others look together.IMG_3607

Article by: Ruth Sloan

Photos by Larry Rosengren

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Horticulture Report: Helichrysum petiolare

Plant Name:  Helichrysum petiolarelicorice-plant1.jpg
Common name:  Licorice plant
Plant type: Annual
(Tender Perennial Zones 9-11)

Height: 6-9 inches
Spread: 1-3 ft
Bloom: White, but Insignificant
Exposure: Full Sun – Part Shade
Soil Requirements:  Average
Water Needs: Dry to medium
Attributes:   Dense trailing silvery leaves, Tolerates poor soil & drought
Notes: Good drainage is a must!
Uses:  Annual, Hanging Baskets, Containers, Rock walls, Annual ground-cover
Native to: Southern Africa
USDA Hardiness Zone: 9-11

Horticulture Report: Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’
Common Name: montbretia
Type: Perennial Bulb
Height: 2-4 feet
Spread: 1-2 feet
Bloom Time: June to August
Bloom Description: Scarlet red
Sun: Full sun -Part shade
Water: Medium amount, but regular watering
Maintenance: Medium
Attributes: Showy Flowers, Attracts Butterflies & Hummingbirds, Deer Resistant,
Use: Cut Garden, Mass plantings, Pool-side planting, Borders, Containers, Contemporary Garden, Cottage Garden, Hummingbird Gardens.
USDA Zone: 5-9

Feast of Will 2018

Yearly, Ashland Garden Club members donated flowers from their personal gardens to create numerous table arrangements for the Ashland Lions Club annual Feast of Will dinner in Lithia Park.    Members of Ashland Garden Club include (many) master gardeners, a state flower judge, retire florists, professional landscapers, and people who just love flowers and plants!

Garden of the Month: June 2018

128 S. Laurel Street:
Luna Bitzer has been gardening at 128 S. Laurel Street for 22 years and it shows. She lives in the historic home there with her husband Joe. He built the charming garden shed and occasionally helps with heavy lifting, but mostly Luna does all the work herself, including some extraordinary tasks such as installing the paver walkway to the front door—using just a shovel—and forming stairs between levels in the terraced yard.

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While she has had some help over the years with specific improvements, such as the all-female group of friends who helped build an arbor, or the Bitzers’ children who helped maintain a pond, she devotes a very large amount of time to keeping the property healthy and beautiful. In summer and fall, she averages 20 hours per week working in the garden. In the winter she takes some time off and in the hottest months of summer she works fewer hours outside. This is the Ashland Garden Club’s Garden of the Month for June.

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Among the biggest trees that dot the third-of-an-acre city lot at the corner of Almond Street are an ancient black oak (Ashland’s 11995 tree of the year), Douglas fir, silver maple, and blue spruce. When this garden was on the AAUW tour ten years ago, Luna created a list of plants with nearly 150 names. Luna’s current favorites include Howard McMinn manzanita, microbiota decussata (a low-growing evergreen cypress), agastache, hesperaloe and several varieties of viburnum, ornamental grasses, and hardy geraniums. Cotoneaster franchetii forms a hedge along the alleyway.

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Luna says that the installation of a deer fence in 2013 changed her life as she no longer has to worry about what she plants or where. The garden is constantly evolving. What was once a pond that she created is now a shady raised bed, and most of the lawn has been converted to a berm that is rarely watered. The hot tub was removed and the deck rebuilt with a roof for outdoor dining. In all, it is a totally enchanting garden.

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Article by: Ruth Sloan