Oregon Snakes

One of many nice qualities about living in Oregon, is its non-poisonous snakes, well all but one!

crotalus_viridis_02.jpg

Western Rattlesnake –   Photo By Gary Stolz, U.S. Fish & Wildlife/Wikimedia

Snakes are beneficial to gardeners, they eat mice, voles, rats, slugs, Japanese beetle grubs and other gardening pests.  Only one snake species in Oregon can harm humans, and that is the venomous Western Rattlesnake.

The Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife (ODFW) reported,  “there are two sub-species of the Western Rattlesnake in Oregon, the Northern Pacific subspecies, found in southwestern Oregon, in the middle and southern Willamette Valley, as well as the Columbia Plateau. The Great Basin subspecies is found in Oregon’s south central areas and the southeastern region. ”

ODFW says Gopher Snakes (Pituophis catenifer) are often mistaken for Rattlesnakes, because Gopher Snakes shake their tail, hiss and strike out with their head, but Gopher Snakes are not venomous, nor do they have rattles on their tails.  Other snakes in Oregon are also harmless to humans and they are beneficial to the environment, too.

Gopher snake

Gopher snake – Photo by Julia Larson/Wikimedia

Oregon snakes:

  • Gopher Snake (Pituophis catenifer)
  • Western rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis)
  • California Mountain Kingsnake (Lampropeltis zonata)
  • Common Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula)
  • Northwestern Garter snake (Thamnophis ordinoides)
  • Pacific Coast Aquatic Garter snake (Thamnophis atratus)
  • Common Garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis)
  • Racer snake (Coluber constrictor)
  • Western Terrestrial Garter snake (Thamnophis elegans)
  • Ground snake (Sonora semiannulata)
  • Striped whipsnake (Coluber taeniatus)
  • Sharp-tailed snake (Contia tenuis)
  • Ring-necked snake (Diadophis punctatus)
  • Night snake (Hypsiglena chlorophaea)
  • Rubber Boa (Charina bottae)

 

Charina_bottae _ Rubber Boa _ USDA Forest Service

Rubber Boa – photo by USDA Forest Service

To learn more about Oregon’s snakes, click on the links below:

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/gardening/snakes-slither-through-garden-eating-slugs-grubs-and-other-pests

http://www.oregonlive.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2015/06/meet_the_snakes_of_oregon.html

Download Oregon’s Fish & Wildlife Brochure … Oregon_Living With Snakes pdf

 

By: Carlotta Lucas

Garden of the Month: August 2017

The garden that Jacob Gougé has created around the home he shares with his wife and LR 5-17daughter at 240 N. First St. reflects both his creativity and his respect for living things.  It is the Ashland Garden Club’s Garden of the Month for August.  Over the 17 years they have lived there, Gougé has salvaged and bartered the materials to create terracing in the back, define garden beds, build a fire pit, display interesting artifacts, and more on this small lot.   It was bare dirt when they moved in.  He is very resourceful.

But Jacob has a generous spirit as well that prompts him to offer lilacs to passersby, share cuttings of his many succulents with those who ask, and invite admiring strangers inside the gate to see the whole garden.

IMG_2993Along with two smaller lilacs elsewhere in front, there is a huge lilac bush in the northwest corner of the fenced area.  Many of the branches of this lilac are five or more inches in diameter and have an unusual shredded bark.  This lilac bush is strong enough to support one end of two hammocks!

There are extraordinary ceramic pieces throughout the property, most of them created by Gougé.  He also pursues all manner of artistic expression via painting, sewing, beading,and other media. In addition, Jacob makes interesting planters for succulents out of stones or gnarled wood in which he drills holes to plant materials and for drainage.

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Food crops are concentrated in the back yard, that Jacob calls his “in town farm.”  This garden is 100% organic.  He grows lettuce all year, protecting the yield from the blazing sun at this time of year with a colorful umbrella.  He also grows asparagus, squash, carrots, snap peas, herbs of many varieties, and much more, often in recycled containers. He starts most plants from seeds in a hot box.  The family has three healthy chickens that provide eggs as well as droppings for compost.IMG_3001FullSizeRender 3

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Dappled Japanese Willow

Plant Name: Salix Integra ‘Hakuro Nishiki’Salix integra Hakuro nishiki
Common Name: Dappled Japanese Willow
Plant type:  Deciduous shrub
Height:  4-6 ft
Spread:  5-7 ft
Bloom Time:   March- April
Flower Color:   Yellow with small catkins (insignificant)
Exposure: Full Sun (with afternoon shade) – Part Shade
Soil Requirements:  Fertile well-drained
Water Needs: Medium to Wet
Attributes:   Colorful Variegated Leaves which are pink in the spring, then mature to variegated shades of pink, creamy white & green, Fall Color of yellow leaves

Uses: Hedge, Shrub Borders,  Stream or Pond Edges, Rain Garden, Wet areas, Erosion control, Winter Interest with gray/green bark
Note:  Tolerates Black Walnut, Tolerates wet areas
Native to: China, Japan, Korea & southeastern Siberia
USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9

Horticulture Report: Allium Moly

Plant Name: Allium Moly (Yellow ornamental onion)

Allium Molly (2)

Allium Moly: ‘Jeannine’

Common Name: Lilly Leek or Golden Garlic
Plant type: Perennial bulb
Height:  18 inches
Spread:   6-9 inches
Bloom Time:   May – June
Flower Color:  Golden Yellow  2-3 inches
Exposure: Morning Sun, Afternoon Shade
Soil Requirements: Average well-drained soil
Water Needs: Medium
Attributes: Showy Flowers, Attracts Butterflies, Fragrant Leaf
Note:  Tolerates Black Walnut, Deer & Rabbit Resistant
Uses: Naturalize, Mixed flower beds, Borders, Cut Flowers
Native to: Southern and Southeastern Europe (Mediterranean)
USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8

Giant flower springs up near Ashland

Much of the trip between Ashland and the Bay area via I-5 can be tedious, but now Ashland has its own novelty to rival the lineup of all those colorful tanker trucks at Truck City at the base of Black Butte near Weed, Moo Donna and Baby Moo as well as Priscilla the Dragon in fields south and north of Yreka. A wonderful, colorful sculpture by southern Oregon artist Cheryl Garcia has been installed on private land south of the freeway, just east of the Skylark complex, between exits 19 and 14. This whimsical installation of a giant (8’) red flower, with three bees hovering over it, is courtesy of Marge and Dave Bernard. The Bernards cannot see this sculpture from their nearby home, but they do have a smaller version (three red flowers, with one bee hovering) that is visible from their home. They chose simply to enliven the view for travelers along that stretch of highway; their good deed for passersby.

Dave Bernard commissioned the sculptures as a birthday gift for wife Marge who is a beekeeper. The installation was completed over Mother’s Day weekend. Cheryl Garcia’s work is well known in Ashland, not only for the enchanting metal flowers at Walker Elementary School but for other metal sculptures in private collections all over town. Garcia spent 200 hours creating this charming work. It is such a gift to the community and to travelers, for which Garcia and the Bernards are to be thanked.

Article by AGC Member: Ruth Sloan
Published in the Daily Tiding June 12, 2017
Photos by Larry Rosengren