Lamium maculatum ‘Pink Pewter’

Lamium maculatum ‘Pink Pewter’Lamium maculatum Pink Pewter
Common Name: spotted deadnettle
Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Lamiaceae
Height: 6 to 8 inches
Spread: 12 to 24 inches
Bloom Time: May to July
Flower:  Light pink
Foliage:  Variegated – silver with green edges
Sun: Part Sun to Full Shade
Soil: Fertile, Loamy, Well-drained
Water:  Needs Medium to moist soil
Maintenance: Low
Uses: Ground Cover, Naturalize, Perennial gardens,
Tolerate: Deer, Heavy Shade
USDA Zone: 2 to 9

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Heuchera ‘Silver Scrolls’

Heuchera ‘Silver Scrolls’Silver scrolls Heuchera
Common Name:  Coral bells
Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Saxifragaceae
Height:  plant 8-12 inches, flower stalks 24-in
Spread: 8 to 12-inch
Bloom Time: June to July
Flower: Pinkish White, Showy
Sun: Filtered sun to part shade
Soil: Rich humus, Well-draining
Water Needs:  Average to Moist
Foliage Colorful!  Emerge silver flushed with burgundy, matures into silver with dark purple veins.
Uses: Edging, Woodland gardens, Containers, Foliage Garden Interest, Perennial beds, Mass plantings for ground cover
Attributes: Deer Tolerant, evergreen in warm climates.
USDA Zone: 4 to 9

Heuchera ‘Dale’s Strain’

Heuchera ‘Dale’s Strain’Heuchera Dale's Strain'
Common Name: American alumroot, Coral bells
Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Saxifragaceae
Height: 18 inches
Spread: 18 inches
Bloom Time: May to June
Flower: Showy Pink
Sun: Part to full shade ( can grow in full sun but needs more water)
Soil: Rich, Moist , Well-draining
Water: Medium to moist
Maintenance: Medium
Attributes:  Deer resistant, Unique silver-blue marbled deep veined foliage
Uses: Edging, Woodland gardens, Containers, Foliage Garden Interest, Cut flower, Perennial beds. Stays evergreen except in harsh climates.
Notes: Deadheading extends flowering season
Native to: North America
USDA Zone: 4 to 7

Plants Chat!

“….experiment showed not only that plants can learnby association — which is pexels-photo-255441.jpegastounding in itself — but also how easily humans underestimate plants. “We are plant blind,”…. Monica Gagliano Ecologist University of Western Australia

There was a very interesting article written by Marta Zaraska in the May 2017 issue of Discover Magazine about the ongoing research on plant behaviors. Gagliano, and other researchers, are discovering how plants talk to each other,  and not only do plants learn by association, but they remember and make decisions. They recognize family members, learn language from their parents, support other plants and warn each other. Some plants even count. They are “brainier than you think”!

Read the full article here….

http://discovermagazine.com/2017/may-2017/smarty-plants

Pear Pleasure

Dessert pears, eating pears, large or small….pears are popular around the world and the Rogue Valley’s climate is perfect for growing pears.  The Rogue Valley was once covered in pear trees and many varieties of extra fancy pears were grown for Harry and David Inc. to ship gourmet fruit baskets nationwide.  So why not grow your own?

In fruit tree catalogs you’ll find European pears,  Heirloom pears,  Asian Pears,  Keeper Pears and pears that are better for espalier.  Dwarf and semi-dwarf varieties of pear trees make it easy for an urban gardener to fit a pear tree into their backyard; some are even small enough grow in a large container.   Pear trees need a pollinator, another pear tree that blooms at the same time to cross-pollinate and bear fruit.  Mostly likely there is a pear tree somewhere in your neighborhood to pollinate your tree, but if not and you only have space for one tree, you can create a combo pear tree by grafting a scionwood branch from another variety onto your tree, or purchase a combo pear tree from a nursery.  Bare-root fruit trees will be arriving at local nurseries soon, so look for fruit trees with healthy grafts, well-balanced branches, and  well-established root systems.

Below are a few heirloom varieties to consider:

Seseckel-pear.jpgckel (Sugar Pear) – American cultivar introduced in 1790. Easy to grow.  Small chubby round pears are small with reddish brown skin,  fine-textured flesh that is sweet richly flavored and juicy. Tolerant of most pear diseases.

 

 Bosc PearBosc – Originated in France or Belgium, discovered in Europe in the 1800’s, then came to America in 1833.  A large pear with a russet skin and high sugar content, slightly fibrous texture and a spicy sweet flavor.

 

ComComice pearice –  Originated in France 1848.  A large pear with greenish yellow skin, buttery tender texture, aromatic and very juicy.  A traditional gift fruit.

 

Green AnjouGreen Anjou – (Beurré d’ Anjou)  Originated in Belgium, introduced to America 1842.  A large conical pear with a short neck stem, it has pale green skin, even when ripe.  Excellent storage pear with smooth texture, lemony flavor, but it’s not very sweet. Good for baking, poaching, roasting, grilling,  and salads.

 

Red AnjouRed Anjou– Originated as a naturally occurring bud sport on a Green Anjou.  It has all the traits of the Green Anjou, except it’s red.   (Wikipedia: Bud sport is part of a plant that shows morphological differences from the rest of the plant)