Feast of Will 2018

Yearly, Ashland Garden Club members donated flowers from their personal gardens to create numerous table arrangements for the Ashland Lions Club annual Feast of Will dinner in Lithia Park.    Members of Ashland Garden Club include (many) master gardeners, a state flower judge, retire florists, professional landscapers, and people who just love flowers and plants!

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Horticulture Report: Cotoneaster salicifolius

Plant Name:  Cotoneaster salicifolius


Common name:  Willow-leaf cotoneaster
Plant type: Broadleaf  Evergreen shrub
Height:  6-8 ft
Width:   6-10 ft
Bloom Time:  May
Flower Color:  Small White
Exposure: Full Sun to Part Shade
Soil Requirements: Well-drained Sandy Loam
Water Needs: Average, tolerates drought       
Attributes:  Non-edible Showy Red Berries in Winter, Arching Habit with open branches, Bird-friendly. 
Uses:  Border, Specimen, Background plant, Bank Cover, Group/Mass Plantings, Hedge, Year-round Interest.
Note: In hot areas part sun is best.
Native to: Western China & Northern India  
USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-8

Low-growing varieties:

Cotoneaster salicifolius ‘Repens’:  Low-growing form. Can use as a groundcover. Covered in red pomes fruits in the fall.  Semi-evergreen in severe winter areas. ‘Green Carpet’ is very similar in habit.

Cotoneaster salicifolius ‘Scarlet Leader’ – Prostrate form creates a mat-like low ground cover only 2-3′ tall but spreads 8- 10′. Foliage is glossy & disease-free. Leaves can have purple hue in winter.  Produces abundant scarlet berries in the winter.

Garden of the Month: June 2018

128 S. Laurel Street:
Luna Bitzer has been gardening at 128 S. Laurel Street for 22 years and it shows. She lives in the historic home there with her husband Joe. He built the charming garden shed and occasionally helps with heavy lifting, but mostly Luna does all the work herself, including some extraordinary tasks such as installing the paver walkway to the front door—using just a shovel—and forming stairs between levels in the terraced yard.

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While she has had some help over the years with specific improvements, such as the all-female group of friends who helped build an arbor, or the Bitzers’ children who helped maintain a pond, she devotes a very large amount of time to keeping the property healthy and beautiful. In summer and fall, she averages 20 hours per week working in the garden. In the winter she takes some time off and in the hottest months of summer she works fewer hours outside. This is the Ashland Garden Club’s Garden of the Month for June.

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Among the biggest trees that dot the third-of-an-acre city lot at the corner of Almond Street are an ancient black oak (Ashland’s 11995 tree of the year), Douglas fir, silver maple, and blue spruce. When this garden was on the AAUW tour ten years ago, Luna created a list of plants with nearly 150 names. Luna’s current favorites include Howard McMinn manzanita, microbiota decussata (a low-growing evergreen cypress), agastache, hesperaloe and several varieties of viburnum, ornamental grasses, and hardy geraniums. Cotoneaster franchetii forms a hedge along the alleyway.

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Luna says that the installation of a deer fence in 2013 changed her life as she no longer has to worry about what she plants or where. The garden is constantly evolving. What was once a pond that she created is now a shady raised bed, and most of the lawn has been converted to a berm that is rarely watered. The hot tub was removed and the deck rebuilt with a roof for outdoor dining. In all, it is a totally enchanting garden.

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Article by: Ruth Sloan

Rogue Valley: June Garden Chores

Average minimum temperature: 49.1 F
Average maximum temperature: 79.4 F
Average Precipitation: 0.89 inches

Sow Seeds for transplanting:
Fall and winter Brussels Sprouts – all month though August
Chinese Cabbage – 6/1-7/15
Fall Broccoli – 6/15-6/30
Late cabbage – all month

Direct Seed:
Bush Beans – All month through July, for September/October harvest
Mid-season Cauliflower 6/15-7/15
Dill – All Month through July
Parsnips 6/15-7/15
Scallions – All month to 7/15, will hold in ground all winter and multiply
Summer Radish – 7/15
Bolt-resistant Lettuce- 2 week intervals through July
Kohlrabi- 6/20 for September though November harvest

Last chance to Direct Seed:
Pole Beans – 6/15
Beets – 6/15
Spring Carrots- 6/15, Fall variety after 7/15
Corn- All month
Cucumbers – 6/10
Leeks- 6/7 to overwinter for spring
Pumpkins (6/15)
Squash (6/15)

Last Chance to Transplant:
Cantaloupe (6/15)
Celery & celeriac (6/15)
Eggplant (6/15)
Peppers (6/10)
Tomatoes (6/15)
Watermelon (6/15)

Information taken from:
Gardening Year ‘Round, Month by Month In the Rogue Valley – A Guide for Family Food Production –  Jackson County Master Gardeners Assoc.

SOU Botanical Tour

Southern Oregon University Botanical Tour features 107 trees, pollinator gardens, and the SOU Farm.  Some trees on the tour are older than the school itself.

In 2014, the Arbor Day Foundation accredited SOU with its  Tree Campus  award, and in 2015 the University became the first Bee Campus in the nation by providing pollinator beds and bee habitats throughout the campus.  SOU has pledged with the Friends of the Earth Bee Cause Campaign to stop the use of all neonicotinoids on campus in an effort to help protect pollinators . Neonicotinoids are harmful systemic insecticides.

SOU offers guided tours and self-guided tours. Brochures can be picked up at the SOU Landscape Services located at 351 Walker Avenue.  Tel: 541-552-6117

Landscape Services Mike Oxendine
Mike Oxendine is SOU’s Landscape Services Supervisor

https://landscape.sou.edu/sou-botanical-tour/

 

Ashland Garden Club members on a guided tour with Mike.